Tips for Maintaining a Healthy Pregnancy

vvIn this millennium we are developing a world community devoted to higher awareness and optimal health. We are questioning the wisdom of high-tech genetically engineered foods. We are returning to good old-fashioned whole foods.

A healthy mother equals a healthy baby. An investment made in healthy living during pregnancy creates benefits that the baby will reap for his or her entire life.

I urge mothers in this country to take advantage of the availability of organic grains and produce. It’s a shame these wholesome foods are more costly. However consider it an investment in your family’s health. What does poor health really cost? Clearly a bundle.

  • Drink plenty of pure water.
  • Eat organic foods, especially leafy greens to build an iron-rich blood supply.
  • Eat an organic source of protein morning and evening. Vegetarians can do this.
  • Pay attention to getting enough vitamins and minerals. Growing a baby is a full-time job; love your body and she’ll do that job well.
  • For your growing baby’s optimum brain development, be sure to eat foods rich in Omega 3 and Omega 6 oils. Sardines are
Sticked

Eating tips for children babies

ccccBabies grow quickly in the first year of life, so they need plenty of energy (kilo joules) and nutrients. A child’s growth isn’t always steady and even, which means that appetite and hunger can be unpredictable.

The amounts of foods eaten by your baby and their interest in food may be a little different from day to day. This is normal and shouldn’t cause any concerns if your baby is growing well.

Introduce solids at about six months of age

Breast milk is an important food for babies until at least 12 months of age, or longer if the mum and baby desire. Infant formula is important until 12 months. By about six months of age, a baby’s iron stores are low and extra foods will be needed to maintain healthy growth and prevent nutritional problems such as iron deficiency. Start to introduce solids around six months of age – when your baby starts showing interest in food.

Clues that your baby is ready for solids

When your baby starts to need

Sticked

nutrition guide for toddlers

Nutrition Through Variety

bniGrowth slows somewhat during the toddler years, but nutrition remains a top priority. It’s also a time for parents to shift gears, leaving bottles behind and moving into a new era where kids will eat and drink more independently.

The toddler years are a time of transition, especially between 12-24 months, when they’re learning to eat table food and accepting new tastes and textures. Breast milk and formula provided adequate nutrition for your child as an infant, but now it’s time for toddlers to start getting what they need through a variety of foods.

How Much Food Do They Need?

Depending on their age, size, and activity level, toddlers need about 1,000-1,400 calories a day. Refer to the chart below to get an idea of how much your child should be eating and what kinds of foods would satisfy the requirements.

Use the chart as a guide, but trust your own judgment and a toddler’s cues to tell if he or she is satisfied and getting adequate nutrition. Nutrition is all about averages so don’t panic if you don’t hit every

Sticked

Scientists May Have Cured Second U.S. Baby with HIV

Five Canadian babies are also showing no signs of virus after treatment

Babies born with HIV now have hope because scientists may have found a way to eliminate the virus from their bodies.

A second U.S. baby and five more in Canada have possibly been cured of the virus that leads to AIDS. No traces of the virus have been found in the children’s systems after receiving treatment.

“This could lead to major changes for two reasons,” says Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, executive director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “Both for the welfare of the child and because it is a huge proof of concept that you can cure someone if you can treat them early enough.”

The first instance of a cure was found two years ago when a Mississippi baby was diagnosed with the virus. Just 30 hours after birth, the infant was transported to the University of Mississippi Medical Center and was started on antiretroviral treatment. Doctors prescribed three aggressive drugs immediately after birth, which proved to make the difference.

Initial levels of the virus were high, and they decreased in the first

Healthy habits for a healthy life12 tips

You can help your child establish healthy behaviour, eating and activity habits from birth. If these habits are established early as part of your family’s lifestyle – a natural part of the way you do things – you won’t have to bring in unpopular ‘rules’ later.

Maintaining healthy habits from the start can help your whole family avoid lifestyle problems that can occur later in life, such as overweight and obesity, type-2 diabetes, types of cancer and high blood pressure.

Here are 12 tips to help you and your family with a healthy lifestyle

1. Promote healthy eating in your home
Children are more likely to develop healthy eating behaviours when they’re given a choice of healthy foods at home, so put healthy foods on your shopping list and prepare nutritional meals and snacks for the whole family. Having fewer unhealthy foods (like soft drinks, chips, lollies and snack bars) in your cupboard means you won’t have to ‘police’ what your children eat.

2. As a family, remind yourselves of the basic foods
These are fruit, vegetables, wholegrain cereals, lean meats and fish, and low-fat dairy foods. Make your shopping list from these groups so it will be easier to prepare family meals

Myth vs Fact Which Solid Foods Baby Should Start With and Why

The baby food landscape is continually evolving, so parents can feel lost and confused when they start feeding their baby solids. Let’s break down what’s myth and fact.

While introducing your baby to solids is an exciting rite of passage, it can also bring a lot of uncertainty, especially for first-time parents. Whether the conversations are taking place in a mommy group or on a message board, many parents circle around those age-old questions about how to give baby the best start possible:

  • “When do I know when my little one is ready?”
  • “Which foods are best to start with?”
  • “And what about food allergies?”

As the science and baby food landscape continue to evolve, parents can find that even between their first and second babies, the answers and available food options have changed. But let’s start with some basics: according to the USDA, during the first year of baby’s life he transitions from being able to only suck and swallow to being able to hold his head up independently and chew more textured foods. On the inside, your precious little one’s digestive tract also undergoes changes as it matures—at first taking in only

10 tips food kids

t’s no surprise that parents might need some help understanding what it means to eat healthy. From the MyPlate food guide to the latest food fad, it can be awfully confusing.

The good news is that you don’t need a degree in nutrition to raise healthy kids. Following some basic guidelines can help you encourage your kids to eat right and maintain a healthy weight.

Here are 10 key rules to live by:

  1. Parents control the supply lines. You decide which foods to buy and when to serve them. Though kids will pester their parents for less nutritious foods, adults should be in charge when deciding which foods are regularly stocked in the house. Kids won’t go hungry. They’ll eat what’s available in the cupboard and fridge at home. If their favorite snack isn’t all that nutritious, you can still buy it once in a while so they don’t feel deprived.
  2. From the foods you offer, kids get to choose what they will eat or whether to eat at all. Kids need to have some say in the matter. Schedule regular meal and snack times. From the selections you offer, let them choose

The Down Syndrome Diagnosis What to Expect after Delivery

It may not be the path you envisioned, but knowing what to expect will give you the confidence to parent a child with Down syndrome

Receiving a prenatal Down syndrome diagnosis can feel overwhelming. While most expectant parents worry about which breast pump to use and which diapers to buy, you will concentrate on what to expect when caring for a baby with Down syndrome.

First, repeat the Boy Scout motto,”Be Prepared,” to yourself about 10 to 20 times. This should become your family’s go-to saying and your key to gliding through the early months. Being prepared and knowing what to expect will give you the confidence you’ll need to parent a child with Down syndrome more easily.

First Appearances

Have you ever held a baby with Down syndrome before? If not, you have a lot to look forward to! Spending time with one of these little cherubs is such a special experience. According to the National Down Syndrome Society, babies with Down syndrome often share a specific and differentiated set of physical characteristics, which include:

  • Almond-shaped eyes
  • Small noses
  • A round face with a slightly flat profile
  • Hyperextending joints
  • Muscle tone deficiency
  • Larger gap

5 Ways to Maintain Baby’s Sleep Schedule While Traveling

If baby’s not happy, nobody’s happy. Use these tips to keep your little one rested and in a good mood on your next trip.

Traveling with your baby or young child can be challenging, especially when it comes to keeping his or her naptime and bedtime routines. Getting good rest is the key to keeping your little one in a good mood when you are away from home, so keep these five tips in mind if you are thinking about traveling in the near future:

  1. Keep baby feeling safe and secure by following the same naptime and bedtime routine that you do at home. Bring along her favorite books, toys and blankets, especially those that she associates with napping and bedtime.
  2. When possible, try to include lots of outdoor activities during the day, but stay close to home (that is, where you are staying) in the evening to help your baby wind down and fall asleep for the night.
  3. Buy a good travel crib. Investing in a sturdy travel crib that offers good support and a comfortable mattress will pay off in better rest for baby—and for you.
  4. Bring along a source of soothing background noise

Twelve steps to a healthy pregnancy

Now that you know you’re pregnant, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself both physically and emotionally. You can boost your chances of having a problem-free pregnancy and a healthy baby by following a few simple guidelines.

Get early prenatal care

Good prenatal care is essential for you and your baby. Call your healthcare provider right away and schedule your first prenatal visit, During that visit you’ll be screened for certain conditions that could lead to complications.

If you haven’t yet chosen a provider, get started now. Finding the right person — whether you’re looking for a doctor or a midwife — can take a while. In the meantime, let your current caregiver know if you’re taking medication or have any medical concerns.

Watch what you eat

Now that you’re eating for two, you may be surprised to learn that you only need about 300 additional calories per day. Make sure you get plenty of protein. You now need 70 grams a day compared to 45 grams before you got pregnant. And while your calcium requirement remains the same, it’s more important than ever that you meet it, which is

healthy drink for kids

We know it’s important to get kids to eat healthy foods, but what about getting them on board with healthy drinks? What kids drink can greatly affect how many calories they consume and the amount of calcium (needed to build strong bones) their bodies get.

Serve Water and Milk

For kids of all ages, water and milk are the best choices, so let them flow. Besides having zero calories,water is a no-sugar thirst-quencher. And 1 cup of milk has 300 milligrams of calcium, so it’s a big contributor to a child’s daily needs.

Here’s how much calcium kids need each day:

  • toddlers (ages 1 to 3 years): 700 milligrams of calcium daily
  • kids (ages 4 to 8 years): 1000 milligrams
  • older kids (ages 9 to 18 years): 1,300 milligrams

The current dietary guidelines for milk or equivalent dairy products or fortified soy beverages are:

  • Kids ages 2 to 3 should drink 2 cups (480 milliliters) every day.
  • Kids 4 through 8 should have 2½ cups (600 milliliters) per day.
  • Kids 9 and older should have 3 cups (720 milliliters) per day.

Choose fat-free (skim) or low-fat (1%) milk products most of the time.

When kids drink too

How I Handled the News Your Baby Needs a Helmet

Having the helmet not only changed my baby, it changed me too.

“It’s not your fault.”

I wanted to believe him. Considering he was a doctor who specialized in cranial therapy and development, I should have believed him. But I didn’t.

I looked down at the beautiful head of my 6-month-old baby sitting in my lap and felt a rush of guilt spill over me.

I saw the flat spot. I had seen it since he was born. My husband and I tried to adjust the car seat; to use a baby positioner; to try to turn his head more one way rather than the other. But none of it had worked. After six months of trying, now we were here in a specialist’s office being told our baby needed a helmet.

According to a study in the journal “Pediatrics,” 47 percent of infants have flat spots on their heads. And although many of them don’t require helmet therapy, the practice is becoming more common.

But it didn’t matter that the doctor said it wasn’t our fault and it was caused by how he had been positioned for months in the birth

10 steps to a healthy pregnancy

Pregnancy is an ideal time to start taking really good care of yourself both physically and emotionally. If you follow the few simple guidelines below, you should give yourself the best chance of having a problem-free pregnancy and a healthy baby.

1. See your doctor or midwife as soon as possible

As soon as you find out you’re pregnant, get in touch with your GP or a midwife to organise your antenatal care. Organising your care early means you’ll get good advice for a healthy pregnancy right from the start. You’ll also have plenty of time to organise any ultrasound scans and tests that you may need.

2. Eat well

Aim to eat a healthy, balanced diet whenever you can. Try to have:

  • At least five portions of fruit and vegetables daily.
  • Plenty of carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta and rice, as the basis of your meals. Choose wholegrain carbohydrates rather than white, so you get plenty of fibre.
  • Daily servings of protein, such as fish, lean meat, eggs, nuts or pulses, and some milk and dairy foods.
  • Two portions of fish a week, at least one of which should be oily. Fish is packed with protein, vitamin D,